Annotated Catalogue – examples

Sample Annotated Catalogue

Here is a sample annotated catalogue. Use it as a guide for structure and the content required.

Baz Luhrmann films constantly re-interpret classic narratives; can this make him an auteur? Item 1: Romeo and Juliet (Dir Baz Luhrmann, 1996). This source is useful as it is one of the main films  Luhrmann has created. It depicts an old tragedy transformed into a re-interpreted version of the original play, which is a regular theme of Luhrmann’s. Luhrmann uses the old English language that Shakespeare intended but uses the mise-en-scene of the 20th century lifestyle. Although the mise en scene is modern it also has religious aspects like the statue of Christ, this also gives an element of history. The costumes of the characters represent their status’ which allows the audience to interact with the visual context, making it an ideal example to refer to for my topic.

Item 2: Moulin Rouge (Dir. Baz Luhrmann, 2001). Very useful source, it shows how Luhrmann uses music from his adolescence this gives the film a sense of modernisation because the music is from the 80’s. The music allows the audience to relate to the narrative because they are familiar with the score. The film is a love story which is shown through music and poetry this gives a classic theme similar to that of Shakespeare. The mise-en-scene from the 1800’s interlinks with the music making it a modern re-interpretation of a classic love story.

Item 3: Australia (dir. Baz Luhrmann, 2008). Very helpful, tells a historical story doesn’t have a modified re-interpretation to the film but does have the same strong romantic narrative which plays a big part in how the films are modernised. This source doesn’t represent the usual interpretations which Luhrmann normally uses: it is set in the past so we can see how society changes over time which helps the audience to relate to the film because of the diverse use of discrimination. The source makes the audience think how different it was then to how it is now.

Magazines

Item 4: Interview with cast of Moulin Rouge and Baz Luhrmann (Empire magazine, 2001). This was a good piece of research as it not only showed how the director transformed the films into a re-interpretation, but it explains why he chose to do so. A quote from the article says that he explores his younger years by using modern music from the 80’s. The article mentions Luhrmann using an ancient myth for the play within the film which gives it another re-interpretation from the past. This source is useful because it gives detailed explanation to why Luhrmann uses the re-interpretation of his childhood music and the ancient myth.

Item 5: Magazine article on Moulin Rouge (Total film, 2001). This source gives a variety of relevant information about the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann uses within his films, a quote says to expect the unexpected. Luhrmann is said to have used elements of plots from the plays La Boheme, Tosca and La Traviata, which are very classic plays, he uses older elements as well as some modern ones too. This source shows the logic behind his re-interpretations, a quote from Luhrmann: musicals contain music which the audience already have a relationship with. It also refers to the use of music which is taken from Luhrmann’s younger year the 70’s.

Item 6: Magazine article on Moulin rouge (Sound and light article, 2001). This source is valuable because it explains the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann uses in his films, a quote says; he uses a combination of pop culture references and sung dialogue; this is one of Luhrmann’s traits as a director. This could suggest that Luhrmann is an auteur because of his own unique style. The source also says that ‘the story of Moulin Rouge is as faithful as Pearl Harbour which is an historic classic; with these two elements combined it explains the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann is known for. This states that Luhrmann could be an auteur because he modernises classic narratives.

Item 7: Review of Romeo and Juliet, Empire magazine. http://www.empireonline.com/reviews/review.asp?FID=3654. This source is good; it explains how the director re-interprets the well known text into a modern day film. It shows how Luhrmann uses the MTV style of film making and transforms the play. This source also mentions how Luhrmann is able to make genres that are out of date into modern styled films which appeal to the public today. The source shows that the film has been re-interpreted into a popular film that the new generation can relate too.

Internet Articles

Item 8: Interview with Baz Luhrmann about Moulin Rouge, the Hollywood Interview, 2001.http://thehollywoodinterview.blogspot.com/2010/02/baz-luhrmann-moulin-rouge-hollywood.html. This source is very useful because it shows that Luhrmann has his own traits he is like an auteur, his films are described as heightened reality. The source explains the different elements that Luhrmann uses like theatre, opera; traditional cinema and pop culture which combined make a totally new genre. Quote from the article, it’s almost as if he took all the music videos, studio musicals, pop albums, and stage productions of the last 100 years and stuck them together to make Moulin Rouge.

Item 9: Interview with Baz Luhrmann, The guardian 2001. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/baz-luhrmann . This source is helpful because it shows why Luhrmann became a director and how he found his love for musicals. Even at a young age he created his first play, strictly ballroom, which was made in a heightened metaphorical style and became his first film. This interview also shows how Luhrmann was influence by his parents; his mother was a dancer and his father was a cinema owner. Luhrmann says that the story of Romeo and Juliet was modified by William Shakespeare from a Greek play which demonstrates that stories are just use over again just adapted to the time which it is recreated, this shows how William Shakespeare also re-interpreted others work. This can be used because it shows Luhrmann’s childhood influenced his style and career choice.

Sample Catalogue Items: Various

Listed below are selected items from a variety of ‘Annotated Catalogue’s’

 

These will give you a solid guide for how to annotate different research material. These are not linked to one topic/subject, but will be useful to see how to summarise the content and usefulness of each resource item that you will be using to produce your Presentation Script. 

 
Film
Item 3: The Devil’s Backbone (Guillermo Del Toro, 2001). I chose this film as this film is also based on personal childhood experiences that have influenced certain aspects of the film. Additionally, in this film, like many of his other films the ‘villain’ is misunderstood to what he is trying to achieve. Also, the director linked both ‘The Devil’s Backbone’ and ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ for people he feels would enjoy the film more. Also, it shows elements religion throughout the film and so can be regarded as a key source for discussion around my topic, although not as relevant as my focus film.

Magazines
Item 6: Encore Magazine: A very useful article, written in August 2010. The article is based on the ‘believability scale’ of Tim Burton’s films. This article talks briefly about the films they have worked together on, but lacks detail as they are simply just listed. The pair are referred to as a ‘match made in heaven’, which is a bit of a cliché as all their work together is deep and dark. They are also said to be quirky and weird as they bring out the best in each other, which therefore helps them to produce the films to the best of their abilities as they add their own stamp to it and work together as a team.Item 6: Time Magazine Interview with Michael Caine, (http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/dvd/the-prestige). In this magazine article Nolan is respected by the writer of this review showing his wide audience how well known his work is. It elaborates how his themes are almost predictable, as you know the ending at the beginning in most of them. This point being in a well-known magazine almost adds to the fact that his work is so well known and how much each piece assembles one another answering the question is he an auteur?


TV
Item 6: This is England on Newsnight Review: This review discusses how Meadows has contradicted the stereotypical view of skinheads as being grounded in racist views, showing the compassionate and heartfelt side of the culture. It also explores how he is able to depict youth culture without using the stereotypical view of violent gangs. The fact that they are far more realistic depictions of youth culture means that they are far more grounded in truth and so are far more relevant. I will use this to discuss how Meadows’ contradicts stereotypes in order to more successfully get his audience to question their beliefs.

Internet
Item 7: http://www.stevenspielberg.co.uk/  This is another useful source as it is Spielbergs own personal site. This, like Wikipedia, gives you a short biography on his life, and also information on his films but is far superior. The site contains some good discussion and insight into my 3 chosen films. This allows me to answer the central argument of my topic question as it backs up the reasons why he uses father figures in the vast majority of his films.

Auteur Theory: Links

Popular Auteur Theory Video Playlist

Posted by John at 03:24 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: Auteur, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

Here is a a very basic version of a presentation script: ‘C grade’

It should only be regarded as a guideline; (references are incomplete: argument is relatively sound: structure is sound)

Presentation Script

How far can the gothic elements used in Tim Burton films classify him as an auteur?

Projector: Display a picture of Tim Burton

Speaker:

For any audience that watches a Tim Burton film, it is easy to spot that his personal life is integrated into his films, especially if you know a bit about his biographical past. This can easily describe Burton as an auteur; an auteur is used to distinguish and evaluate good directors from bad ones, and also reflects the director’s personal vision which is easily shown in many of Burtons films. For example, when he was younger he’d draw monsters; “It’s weird, but the only experiences I remember from my childhood are the one which had a major impact,’ Burton claimed. ‘Fearful things, like from a scary movie.” [7] If you know what Burton looks like/dresses like, you can easily see that this is integrated into his films. In ‘Edward Scissorhands’ [1] the similarities in how both Burton and Edward look is quite obvious, for example they both have dark, messy hair; “spiky hands aside, Edward even looks a bit like him,” [7] he also adapts his own personal environment that he grew up in into the film – the suburban town. Even Alice in Wonderland [2] manages to relate to Burton’s personal childhood, and we could even possibly relate him to the Mad Hatter – again based more on the appearance and maybe even some psychological aspects.

Projector: Display Youtube clip of the trailer (Item 12) for Edward Scissorhands [1] – 2:06mins.

Speaker:

Edward Scissorhands is a well-known film made by Burton in 1990. Burton easily managed to show some of his own personal life through this film such as the fact he himself was quite socially isolated. Edward was made by his ‘father’ and given scissors for hands, however eventually his father died and so Edward was left in the mansion on his own, isolated from the world around him. To cope with his isolation, he would cut bushes into shapes that showed how he was feeling. “Scissorhands is arguably Burton’s most personal film, a moving portrait of an artistic outsider who cannot touch what he desires without destroying it.” [8] Edward would end up cutting his face and hurting other people and eventually he learnt that he couldn’t get close to anybody; this didn’t help the fact that he was socially unacceptable and maybe even unexplainable.

Projector: Display youtube clip of the trailer (Item 14) for Edward Scissorhands [1] – 1:42mins.

Speaker:

This clip shows the mansion for what it used to be and what it is in the present part of the film, even though it hadn’t actually changed that much. The fact that he lives in a dark mansion can immediately show something gothic about the film; it’s dark, empty, isolated and has the simple mise-en-scene such as cobwebs and old, wooden, dusty furniture, along with the lighting which is obviously low key. The slow pan around the room with the light wind blowing the curtains creates an eerie feeling, which is showed well by the cinematography. In the roof of the mansion, there is a slow zoom as Edward comes out of a dark corner, the only lighting shown is that through a hole in the roof which again is a typical convention used by many ‘horror’ films. The use of the shadow on his face as he’s coming out of the corner is usually used to portray a character as ‘bad’ however, as Edward comes into the light the expression on his face tells a completely different story and we soon grasp that Edward is not that of a ‘bad’ character, yet a character that just wants some warmth and comfort. “Johnny Depp brings a feeling of tortured emotion to his almost silent character that lingers long in the memory.” [8] Tortured emotion is a well-known and well-used convention amongst many gothic films; the fact that the definition of a ‘goth’ would be strange, emotionally and socially inapt and even artistic.

This clip also shows the contrast between the mansion that sat on top of a pastel-coloured suburban town. At first Edward is isolated and withdrawn from society, which is greatly shown by the cinematography. For example, the fact he has scissors for hands suggests the fact that he is ‘strange’ compared to societies norms. “Taken from his gothic castle to a colourful and romanticised suburban neighbourhood he changes the lives of the townsfolk forever.” [8]

Throughout many ‘gothic’ films, at least one of the characters is usually socially impaired and find it difficult to ‘fit in’ which is exactly what Edward found when making the transition from the mansion to the suburban town.

Even the town can be seen to be ‘strange’ from a social view; “through visual and narrative cues, the neighbourhood is portrayed as exceptionally absurd. The odd pastel coloured houses are one such cue; as is their constant gossiping behaviour, which is taken to excess.” [9]

Although item 8 argues that it is the townsfolk that are strange and that Edward is actually the most ‘normal;’ “Edward is the most normal person in the movie and it is the twisted townsfolk who are the true monsters, resulting in his loss of innocence,” [8] item 9 argues that it is actually Edward that is strange and not the townsfolk, but only because compared to their normality, Edward is quite absurd and socially inapt.

Projector: Display a poster for Alice in Wonderland [2]

Speaker:

Alice in Wonderland (2010) was Burton’s first 3D film and was actually a follow on from the Disney classic. The Underland “an alternate land populated by bizarre characters” [6] is again similar to Burton’s own personal life of his passion with monsters and strange goings on, some of the aspects of the film fit well into conventions of gothic films.

“Alice meets a bizarre-looking white rabbit, and consequently follows him into a hole and into Wonderland. What she finds is, says Burton, ‘a place in decline, overgrown, with a slightly haunted quality to it.” [6] When Alice first goes into the Underworld and meets teedledum and teedledee you can immediately see the simple gothic elements used such as the midst, the freaky trees and even the freaky characters. Although this is a PG rated film and a fairytale I don’t think it would take much to freak children out. Scary looking talking animals in a creepy looking forest that wouldn’t be surprising if the plants started talking gives a great sense of fear and shock to any audience watching this film.

Projector: Display youtube clip of Alice meeting the Mad Hatter [13] -1.00min

Speaker:

This clip really does show the simple gothic elements of any horror movie. “But this 3D Underland, tricked out with curlicues, crooked branches and sad faced freaks” [5] is well showed by the tea party; the misty background with the leafless trees that are practically shadowed into the background with the leaves on the dirty ground, as where the Mad Hatter lives is practically in the middle of a forest. We also see his little house he lives in, but only in the background – the simple elements of this equal to those in Edward Scissorhands [1] as his mansion is on top of a hill, misty and gothic looking. However, the Mad Hatters house is a little wooden shack that is practically falling down, we see a bit of light out of the window – similar to when we see any gothic looking house. The simple mise-en-scene of the film like the long table is a very well used convention in many films that tend to use a big gothic mansion. The broken cups, cutlery and the horrible looking food are also well-used conventions used in films where such mansions have been abandoned or tampered with. We then see another shot of the shack that actually makes it look like an old, abandoned windmill and that actually quite a few lights are on, however it does not change the eerie feeling it gives us, added by the midst, and how gothic it does actually look.

Projector: Display poster for Corpse Bride [3]

Speaker:

Corpse Bride which is “using stop-motion animation to gorgeously ghoulish effect,” [10] Burton makes another PG film that could be out to freak the children out, who obviously would be it’s main audience seeing as it’s about the Underworld populated by the dead.

Projector: Display youtube clip of Corpse Bride [3] trailer [15] – 1.18mins.

Speaker:

The simple storyline of the film about a corpse immediately can be seen as a gothic element. Then, throughout the film and because it is based on the dead, we see other simple things such as the forest with bare branches, leaves on the ground and the midst; elements similar to those in Edward Scissorhands [1] around his mansion and Alice in Wonderland [2] at the Mad Hatters party. The fact that Corpse Bride also has an ‘Underworld’ is similar to Alice in Wonderlands ‘Underland,’ however, the only difference being is that Corpse Brides Underworld is more for the dead instead of freaky beings. The fact that it is for the dead is a major convention for gothic movies.

“The contrast between the grey, drab world of the living and the colorful land of the dead works superbly.” [8] Although the land is a lot more colourful than the Underworld, as it would be in any movie, the land still has its downfalls; of course the forest is going to be dark, scary and have conventions similar to those in many other gothic movies.

Projector: Display pictures of all three films and Burton himself.

Speaker:

In conclusion, Burton worked well as an auteur and managed to integrate a lot of his personal life into his films. Although there are many theories that the auteur theory doesn’t exist, this manages to prove that it does. He easily manages to put across the simple conventions of gothic elements and portrays a distinctive effort of this.

*This is by no means a perfect example and should be considered a ‘draft’ script

*Images may be included.

*More analysis would improve.

*Argument could be stronger.

Posted by John at 13:53 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Auteur, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

FM4 – Spectatorship – Experimental and Expanded Film/Video

David Lynch (Surrealist filmmaker/auteur)

There are several recurring themes within Lynch’s work that not only make him a surrealist filmmaker but suggest that he could be considered an auteur: “his films are so packed with motifs, recurrent characters, images, compositions and techniques that you could view his entire output as one large jigsaw puzzle of ideas”. One of the key themes is the usage of dreams and dreamlike imagery within his works, something that is related to the “surrealist ethos” of relying “on the subconscious to provide visual drive”. The “dreamlike logic” of the narrative found in Eraserhead, Mulholland Drive and Inland Empire. Lynch has stated that “Waking dreams are the ones that are important, the ones that come when I’m quietly sitting in a chair, letting my mind wander. When you sleep, you don’t control your dream. I like to dive into a dream world that I’ve made or discovered; a world I choose… [You can’t really get others to experience it, but] right there is the power of cinema.”

The theme of industry is often repeated “the clunk of machinery, the power of pistons, shadows of oil drills pumping, screaming woodmills and smoke billowing factories”, as can be seen with the industrial wasteland in Eraserhead,. Lynch has stated that “It makes me feel good to see giant machinery, you know, working: dealing with molten metal. And I like fire and smoke. And the sounds are so powerful. It’s just big stuff. It means that things are being made, and I really like that.”

Another theme is the idea of a “dark underbelly” of violent criminal activity within a society, such as with Frank’s gang in Blue Velvet. The idea of deformity is also found in several of Lynch’s films, from the protagonist in The Elephant Man, to the deformed baby in Eraserhead, as is the idea of death from a head wound, found in most of Lynch’s films. Other imagery commonly used within Lynch’s works are flickering electrictity or lights, as well as fire and the idea of a stage upon which a singer performs, often surrounded by drapery.

Lynch also tends to feature his leading female actors in multiple or “split” roles, so that many of his female characters have multiple, fractured identities. In Lost Highway, Patricia Arquette plays the dual role of Renee Madison/Alice Wakefield, while in Mulholland Drive, Naomi Watts plays Diane Selwyn/Betty Elms and Laura Harring plays Camilla Rhodes/Rita and in Inland Empire, Laura Dern plays Nikki Grace/Susan Blue. By contrast, Lynch rarely creates multi-character roles for his male actors.

Edited from wikipedia

Posted by John at 12:36 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Experimental and Expanded Film/Video, FM4, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project Guidance

Here is an extract from a well structured Presentation Script with good referencing and relatively sound argument. Use it as a guide to the way your own script should be submitted.

Dysfunctional families are a predominant factor in Haneke’s films. Does this make Haneke an auteur?

Projector: Image of Michael Haneke (Item 16)

Speaker:

Michael Haneke is an Austrian filmmaker, and has made many films in the languages of English, German and French. Anyone watching Haneke films will recognize a similarity in his dark, disturbing style and his strong use of dysfunctional families as well as his tendency to shock and confuse the audience with ambiguous narrative.

I believe that these things, which I will explain in more detail later, make Haneke an auteur. Auteurship cannot be given to all directors and in one premise of auteur theory is the “distinguishable personality of the director” and “Over a group of films, a director must exhibit certain recurrent characteristics of style, which serve as his signature” (Item 7).

Projector: Trailer of Funny Games (2007) – (2m 17s) (Item 19)

Speaker:

In this trailer for the US version of Funny Games you can see the characteristics of the film displayed in a clear narrative, which is contrasting to his style and the true ambiguous narrative, however it appeals to the audience Haneke wants to attack it was as in an interview he says Funny Games was “intended to be for a public of violence consumers” (Item 14). It also highlights the ‘perfect’ family and outsiders that pray on this perfection, a lot like the viewers of Hollywood films do.

Haneke remade Funny Games to make it identical to the original with the same recurring themes and interior meaning. When asked about the remake in a 2008 on-set interview (item 15), Haneke stated “when I did the first Funny Games it was intended to be for a public of violence consumers in the English-speaking world … the German language the film stayed always in the art houses and so didn’t reach the public that it would need to have.” Thus showing that the intention of the film was not to entertain but for the purposes of highlighting our apparent acceptance of violence and death in films. Haneke says that he finds it irritating that “in this kind of post-modern view of life it became chic to make violence as an entertainment, even for the filmmakers and the critics, and this I find is a little bit disgusting.” (Item 15) It is this type of attitude that suggests that Haneke is an auteur, as “The way a film looks and moves should have some relationship to the way a director thinks and feels.” (Item 7).

Projector: Clip of scene where Georgie dies and Paul is looking in the fridge at 1h 1m 10s – (1m) (Item 2)

Speaker:

As you can see, Peter and Paul casually discuss who to kill first, and Paul says he’s going to get something to eat, and asking who else wants food; highlighting their casual view of killing people, paralleling how the audience’s opinion on violence/death in movies. In keeping with Haneke’s hate of violence on screen, when Georgie is shot, there is no violence shown, just a gunshot and blood on the TV at the end of the sequence. This is symbolic of Haneke’s view of Hollywood/media in general – filled with glorified violence. Also, the fact that a child is shot is shocking, yet another aspect of Haneke’s signature style, which once again supports the argument for being an auteur as (Item 7) “a director is forced to express his personality through the visual treatment of material”.

Posted by John at 08:38 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Auteur, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Thursday, 11 September 2014

Sample Annotated Catalogue

Here is another sample annotated catalogue. Use it as a guide for structure and the content required.

First draft deadline: 26/9/14
Baz Luhrmann films constantly re-interpret classic narratives; can this make him an auteur?

Item 1: Romeo and Juliet (Dir Baz Luhrmann, 1996). This source is useful as it is one of the main films  Luhrmann has created. It depicts an old tragedy transformed into a re-interpreted version of the original play, which is a regular theme of Luhrmann’s. Luhrmann uses the old English language that Shakespeare intended but uses the mise-en-scene of the 20th century lifestyle. Although the mise en scene is modern it also has religious aspects like the statue of Christ, this also gives an element of history. The costumes of the characters represent their status’ which allows the audience to interact with the visual context, making it an ideal example to refer to for my topic.

Item 2: Moulin Rouge (Dir. Baz Luhrmann, 2001). Very useful source, it shows how Luhrmann uses music from his adolescence this gives the film a sense of modernisation because the music is from the 80’s. The music allows the audience to relate to the narrative because they are familiar with the score. The film is a love story which is shown through music and poetry this gives a classic theme similar to that of Shakespeare. The mise-en-scene from the 1800’s interlinks with the music making it a modern re-interpretation of a classic love story.

Item 3: Australia (dir. Baz Luhrmann, 2008). Very helpful, tells a historical story doesn’t have a modified re-interpretation to the film but does have the same strong romantic narrative which plays a big part in how the films are modernised. This source doesn’t represent the usual interpretations which Luhrmann normally uses: it is set in the past so we can see how society changes over time which helps the audience to relate to the film because of the diverse use of discrimination. The source makes the audience think how different it was then to how it is now.

Magazines

Item 4: Interview with cast of Moulin Rouge and Baz Luhrmann (Empire magazine, 2001). This was a good piece of research as it not only showed how the director transformed the films into a re-interpretation, but it explains why he chose to do so. A quote from the article says that he explores his younger years by using modern music from the 80’s. The article mentions Luhrmann using an ancient myth for the play within the film which gives it another re-interpretation from the past. This source is useful because it gives detailed explanation to why Luhrmann uses the re-interpretation of his childhood music and the ancient myth.

Item 5: Magazine article on Moulin Rouge (Total film, 2001). This source gives a variety of relevant information about the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann uses within his films, a quote says to expect the unexpected. Luhrmann is said to have used elements of plots from the plays La Boheme, Tosca and La Traviata, which are very classic plays, he uses older elements as well as some modern ones too. This source shows the logic behind his re-interpretations, a quote from Luhrmann: musicals contain music which the audience already have a relationship with. It also refers to the use of music which is taken from Luhrmann’s younger year the 70’s.

Item 6: Magazine article on Moulin rouge (Sound and light article, 2001). This source is valuable because it explains the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann uses in his films, a quote says; he uses a combination of pop culture references and sung dialogue; this is one of Luhrmann’s traits as a director. This could suggest that Luhrmann is an auteur because of his own unique style. The source also says that ‘the story of Moulin Rouge is as faithful as Pearl Harbour which is an historic classic; with these two elements combined it explains the modern re-interpretation which Luhrmann is known for. This states that Luhrmann could be an auteur because he modernises classic narratives.

Item 7: Review of Romeo and Juliet, Empire magazine. http://www.empireonline.com/reviews/review.asp?FID=3654. This source is good; it explains how the director re-interprets the well known text into a modern day film. It shows how Luhrmann uses the MTV style of film making and transforms the play. This source also mentions how Luhrmann is able to make genres that are out of date into modern styled films which appeal to the public today. The source shows that the film has been re-interpreted into a popular film that the new generation can relate too.

Internet Articles

Item 8: Interview with Baz Luhrmann about Moulin Rouge, the Hollywood Interview, 2001.http://thehollywoodinterview.blogspot.com/2010/02/baz-luhrmann-moulin-rouge-hollywood.html. This source is very useful because it shows that Luhrmann has his own traits he is like an auteur, his films are described as heightened reality. The source explains the different elements that Luhrmann uses like theatre, opera; traditional cinema and pop culture which combined make a totally new genre. Quote from the article, it’s almost as if he took all the music videos, studio musicals, pop albums, and stage productions of the last 100 years and stuck them together to make Moulin Rouge.

Item 9: Interview with Baz Luhrmann, The guardian 2001. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/baz-luhrmann . This source is helpful because it shows why Luhrmann became a director and how he found his love for musicals. Even at a young age he created his first play, strictly ballroom, which was made in a heightened metaphorical style and became his first film. This interview also shows how Luhrmann was influence by his parents; his mother was a dancer and his father was a cinema owner. Luhrmann says that the story of Romeo and Juliet was modified by William Shakespeare from a Greek play which demonstrates that stories are just use over again just adapted to the time which it is recreated, this shows how William Shakespeare also re-interpreted others work. This can be used because it shows Luhrmann’s childhood influenced his style and career choice.

Posted by John at 09:40 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: ‘A’ Grade Coursework, A2 Film, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Friday, 29 August 2014

Sample Annotated Catalogue


Does the constant use of a ‘triumphant underdog’ character make Clint Eastwood an auteur? 
 
Annotated Catalogue


Films
Item 1 – Unforgiven (1992)
I chose this film as my focus film as it shows all of Eastwood’s auteur themes, like his anti-hero characters, dark, gripping and embracing complex narrative, …… It also stresses the importance of establishing shots and the landscape itself and the theme that I am focusing on, the triumphant under-dog; my focus being more on females triumphing. This film also offers a clear relationship between Eastwood and the genre (western) that developed, not only his …… and style, but his directing style and views, influenced by Don Siegel (director for ‘Man With No Name’ trilogy).

Item 2 – Changeling (2008)
This film helps to show my more in depth focus of women underdogs and Eastwood’s subtle constant theme of feminism. This is also a good film to focus purely on Eastwood’s directing as, unlike my focus film and other chosen film, he both stars and directs. I chose this film over any other film that Eastwood has solely directed because it portrays my chosen theme as well as being ………… I will also compare the similarities and differences with his progression as a director.

Item 3 – Million Dollar Baby (2003)
This is my final film as it presents the theme of feminism clearly and the triumph of the male and female under dogs of Eastwood’s character and Hilary Swanks character. This was a successful film for Eastwood and enables me to discuss Eastwood as an auteur as his films often have a dark narrative, clearly seen through him directing the darkest of the Dirty Harry series compared to the others and the not fully happy endings, both in Million Dollar Baby and Changeling. This film gives a good focus point of a female in a male dominated world (like all three of the films I have chosen).

Documentaries

Item 4 – Inside The Actor’s Studio
I have used this documentary because it not only gives the audiences response to the film and Eastwood himself, as an actor, director, producer, screenwriter and score composer, but also give Eastwood’s feeling towards his work and personal life. Knowing what happens in Eastwood’s personal life and what ………… reasoning to why he directs the way he does and how and why he chooses the scripts to produce and work on. This documentary offers a complete insight into Eastwood’s ways and attitude towards the film industry and others he has worked with and for and their influences on him. This documentary also helps to understand the constant theme of feminism and why Eastwood …………………………………

Interviews
Item 5 – David Letterman Interview (January 14, 2009)
This interview focuses on all of my films with additional films and from this I can use information about the film, in turn information about my chosen theme. Also I am able to have some insight into Eastwood’s personal life and personal reasons for why he chose certain scripts, settings and filming techniques. In this interview Eastwood also gives his personal feelings towards ……………….

Magazine
Item 6 – Uncut DVD (Nov – Dec 2005)
I have chosen to use this magazine as a source due to the in depth information written about Eastwood and his films. This magazine gives the opinions of people who have worked close to Eastwood,….
Item 7 – Empire, Damon Wise, (May 20, 2008)
This article gives an outsiders view on Eastwood’s work and provides quotes from people who have worked with Eastwood; this will help me to understand his work more from behind the scenes of his films. ………………………..

Item 8 – Variety, Todd McCarthy,(May 20, 2008)
From this article I am getting a reviewers viewpoint on Eastwood’s film Changling. This will help to add opinions from other people as well as myself and bring a more equally balanced argument. …………………….

Internet
Item 9 – Empireonline (http://www.empireonline.com/search/default.asp?search=eastwood)
This is a good source, and provide reviews on all of my chosen films, giving others opinions on the films and not only close friend, Eastwood himself or from face to face interviewers, allowing …….

Item 10 – sensesofcinema.com
This website has many comments from close friends, people who have worked with and for Eastwood, and several comments from Eastwood himself. I am using this site as it gives a large range and variety of comments and opinions. It also gives a back-story to Eastwood and his history growing up and …..

Item 11http://www.screenplaydb.com/film/scripts/unforgiven.pdf
This is a copy of the script to Unforgiven; I am going to use this to use direct quotes for the film from here to help show the important physical defects that creates the triumphant underdog in ………..

Books
Item 12 – Oxford Guide to Film Studies
I am using this book because it has an in-depth analysis of genre and ……………..techniques and effects, these will then in turn enable me to see and recognise common techniques used throughout my chosen films and help ……….. I will also use auteur theory quotes from this book to help prove Eastwood as an auteur.

Item 13 – Clint: The Life and Legend (Patrick McGilligan)
Patrick McGilligan presents Clinton Eastwood Junior -the man, the actor, and the star- as he is, not as he is portrayed to be. He effectively reveals …………….. most of which are not flattering, from Eastwood’s childhood, ………. success and stardom; all angles and every insight into Eastwood’s life draws information for directing theme.

Newspapers
Item 14 – The New York Times (August 7, 1992)
This article gives a passionate review of Eastwood’s performance in Unforgiven and compares it to his performances in “The Man With No Name” Trilogy and ………. I will use these comparisons as evidence in my presentation script on the topic of underdogs.

Item 15
– The Guardian, Elizabeth Day. Article – “Gentle Man Clint”. (November 2, 2008)
I will use the interviews in this article from Eastwood’s co-workers to get an in-depth feel of Eastwood’s character and work behind scenes to help put forward the idea of Eastwood being an auteur and the factors that help make him one.

Item 16 – The New Yorker, David Denby. Article – “Out of the West”. (March 8, 2010)
This article offers several opinions on two of my films, highlighting the feminist argument put across in Eastwood’s film. I will use the comparison to shows the auteur theme that runs throughout Eastwood’s films.

Rejected Items
Film: Play Misty For Me
I first chose this film as I thought it would be a good comparison piece of Eastwood’s older and newer work; Play Misty For Me being the older works of Eastwood in my comparison. I considered this film, over other older directory works of Eastwood, as it was the first film that Eastwood directed, making it more significant, and offer a more precise depiction of Eastwood’s auteur themes. …… not to be the best comparison piece to show Eastwood as an auteur.
Interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsHbxgfyhM4
I rejected this interview because most of the information given I already have from other websites. The extra information given by Eastwood in this interview was irrelevant and added no extra support to why Eastwood uses my questioned theme.
Website: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000142/bio
This website only gave an overview and the years of every film Eastwood started in and directed and didn’t give any necessary detail about the themes used in the films or why Eastwood use them. It also provides a lot of interesting trivia but none relative to why Eastwood uses triumphant underdogs.
Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clint_Eastwood

The information that i found useful on this website i also found on others that i have decided to use. i chose the other websites over this on as they are more reliable and gave more in depth information about the same points made.

Posted by John at 11:12 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Sample ‘Research Question’ & ‘Annotated Catalogue’

To what extent can breaking moral boundaries be regarded as Vincenzo Natali’s signature style?

Films:

  1. CUBE (1997) Dir. Vincenzo Natali: Cube is a good example for research as it is the first film of Natali’s that explores societal issues and moral boundaries. The film’s main theme of imprisonment by higher authorities is expressed through the character’s names (named after prisons) and its ‘Kafkaesque’ setting. Despite having many of Cronenberg’s ‘body horror’ elements, Natali explores the metaphysical side of science fiction, rather than the physical. The metaphor of the ‘cube’ itself symbolises the never ending struggle people face every day in order to escape the ruling classes: the dominance of one social group over another is a classic Marxist ideology, used frequently in both Natali and Cronenberg’s productions.
  1. NOTHING (2003)Dir. Vincenzo Natali: ‘Nothing’ focuses on the idea of two troubled individuals, who develop the ability to ‘hate away’ life’s problems. The emphasis on the moral boundaries involved in this is a key trait in Natali’s films and makes this film a key focal point of research. Despite its tabooed nature, suicide is a key theme throughout the film portraying the psychological effects of a disturbed childhood. This is very much inspired by Cronenberg’s tabooed and topical exploration of violence and relationships in ‘The Fly’ and ‘The Brood’.
  1. SPLICE (2009) Dir. Vincenzo Natali: Natali’s latest film – and a valuable indication of his progress as a director – ‘Splice’, experiments with the direction science is headed and how easily moral boundaries can be broken within this field. Deemed as a modern day ‘Frankenstein’, the film explores the dangers of attempting to create a ‘perfect human’. The themes here pay distinct homage to ‘The Fly’; however Natali adds his own variation to this. The transformation of each creature is similar in both films; building up a sense of character and therefore the viewer is able to relate to the emotional performances of both Jeff Golblum and Delphine Chaneac. The sexual boundaries are explored through the dysfunctional sex scenes within the film. Natali’s intention for this was to test the viewer’s ability to comprehend the strange sexual desire. This draws inspiration from the dangerous sexual tendencies of Cronenberg’s ‘Crash’.

This example provides a good guide as to how to structure your catalogue and discuss WHY you have chosen each film in respect of your topic. It doesn’t go into detailed analytical detail about the film itself in terms of key scenes (save that discussion for the presentation script). It does discuss how each item relates to the topic. You may also wish to state HOWuseful it is to answering your proposal. 

The finished catalogue achieved an A grade by being as thorough throughout all items.

Posted by John at 08:32 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: ‘A’ Grade Coursework, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Friday, 20 December 2013

New Deadline – Finished ‘Small-scale Research Project’

A2 Deadline – ‘Small-scale Research Project’

All Small-scale Research Projects must be submitted by (or before):
Monday 13th January 2014

  • Printed Copy
  • Blog Updated

Posted by John at 15:30 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, A2 Media, FM3, MS3, Research Investigation, Small-scale Research Project

Thursday, 19 December 2013

Sample Presentation Scripts (Partial) Danny Boyle & David Lynch

Can Danny Boyle’s reliance upon moral narratives qualify him as an auteur?
(Item 4) Play Sunshine DVD extra – “Web Production Diaries – Danny Boyle Introduction” (50 secs)

Speaker:
By definition, an auteur is said to have ‘an intended consistency throughout their work in either style or theme’ (item 14).With this in mind, can we consider Danny Boyle as an auteur by referring to the continued use of moral narratives that we see throughout his work?  This clip gives us an idea of what Danny Boyle wants to create through his films. This particular clip, I felt really introduces some of the themes that need to be recognised when looking at Boyle’s filmography e.g. religion and spirituality. This is suggested when he says ‘getting close to the source of all creation, which for us is that star.’

“I wanted the films to be life-affirming so that you leave the film more alive than when you went in” – Danny Boyle (Item 9)
– Quote displayed on slide

Speaker:
This quote from Danny Boyle, immediately gives some insight into the reasoning behind his narratives and characters. By suggesting that he wants his films to have a significant impact on its viewers, the use of moral narratives would make for a great starting point. If we begin by looking at Boyle’s most successful film, Trainspotting, we are able to see some ways in which Boyle tries to achieve this.

(Item 1) Play opening of Trainspotting – “choose life” sequence (1min20secs)

Speaker:
This ‘Ranted catalogue’ (item 13) that narrates this opening sequence, introduces the audience to main character Renton. It invites the idea that Renton is going to “choose Life” (item 1). Each part of the catalogue is a suggestion of what Renton believes a ‘normal’ life entails – “choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players and electric tin openers” (item 1). It is almost the humdrum aspects of life that reflects being ‘human’. This speech gives an almost Marxist view on what is seen to be ‘normal’. It is aspects of life that people must conform to in order to be considered a respectable part of society; it is what Marx might describe as ‘Capitalist Oppression.’ This gives the audience an array of ideas for the ‘meaning’ of the film.  As the films anti-hero, Renton’s rant is a major part in the moral theme of Trainspotting.

Speaker:
The depth of Danny Boyle’s characters, however, has in fact been criticised. Ronan Bennett (novelist and screenwriter) describes the heart of Shallow Grave as’Cruel Emptiness’ and the ‘absence of any character to sympathise or engage with made it very hard to find an emotional response’ (item 11). Although this could be said to be a justified argument it could also be suggested that this ‘cold’ representation is exactly the point. Boyle may have been trying to show how such things (in this case, a large sum of money) can tear a friendship apart and completely change a person. This can also be said for the so called ‘largely unsympathetic’ (item 11) characters of Trainspotting. The representation may be exactly how the characters are supposed to be viewed by the audience in order to suggest the consequences of their life-style.

This use of ‘cold’ characters helps to add verisimilitude to his works, which is another of Boyle’s techniques. Despite often using dreams sequences in his films, i.e. ‘The Worst Toilet in Scotland’ sequence from Trainspotting, Boyle still manages to create a feeling of truth in his films. If we look at A Life Less Ordinary, we can clearly see the fantasy element that is included right from the opening scene. (Takes place in the ‘heavens police department’) (Item 3).  However, Boyle is still able to create that feeling of truth that is so prominent throughout his films. It could also be suggested that Danny Boyle opts for a cinema verite style in some of his films, again helping to keep the films believable.

Play A Life Less Ordinary – Chapter 12, The Deal (Item 3)

Speaker:
It would seem that it is his themes, characters and locations that help to lend this verisimilitude. If we look at this scene from A Life Less Ordinary, we can see how the mise-en-scene helps to keep the narrative believable. The location is simply a road in America and none of the characters stand out particularly, this idea of being ‘ordinary’ is what makes the somewhat supernatural subplot remain believable.

Can David Lynch’s constant use of contrasting women define the director as an auteur?

PLAY:
>CLIP OF THE TWO FEMALE PROTAGONISTS IN MULHOLLAND DRIVE (ITEM3)

SPEAKER:
Again this trademark is present within this film, Mulholland Drive (item 3), where the two female protagonists are polar opposites at the start, and then switch around to be polar opposites differently within the ending. Betty and Rita are the polar opposites of each other within the fact that their ambitions and situations are completely different. Another example of polar opposites is back at ‘Wild at Heart’ within (item 10), as Sailor and Lula are at a metal concert, then Sailor asks them to play Elvis, and they do. This is extremely polar opposite, as you would not expect a rock band to blast out Elvis on demand. Therefore this is another example, which contributes towards the fact that this constant use of the polar opposite technique being linked to the auteurism of David Lynch.

SHOW:
>QUOTE FROM (ITEM 8) WWW.THECITYOFABSURDITY.COM
-“She [his sister Margaret] was afraid of green peas. I think it had to do with the consistency and strengths of the outer surface, then the softness of what was inside when you broke the outer membrane. It was a big thing in our family. She’d have to hide them.”

SPEAKER:
Now we have seen examples of Lynch’s auteurism, we then go into question the influences for this technique, for example, we question whether Lynch has always been surrounded by the behaviour he envisions within his films. Here we see the depth he has gone into about his sister’s dislike for green peas, an obsession that she seems to have, and he has latched onto. Another example of this is in (item 11) where in an interview Lynch actually states that he ‘laches onto wonderful ideas’; it is as if Lynch bases his films around the obsessive ideas he gets within his head, which refuse to go away. ‘”I didn’t have a script. I wrote the thing scene by scene, without much of a clue where it would end.” (item 15) This makes us question into how much depth he goes into regarding the contrasting women within his films, and if the subtlety, or maybe it’s an obsession, of the difference of hair colour stands for so much more in Lynch’s auteuristic visions.

SHOW:
>QUOTE FROM (ITEM 8) WWW.THECITYOFABSURDITY.COM
“Absurdity is what I like most in life, and there’s humor in struggling in ignorance. If you saw a man repeatedly running into a wall until he was a bloody pulp, after a while it would make you laugh because it becomes absurd. But I don’t just find humor in unhappiness – I find it extremely heroic the way people forge on despite the despair they often feel. Like the character in ‘Eraserhead’ -he’s totally confused, yet he struggles to figure things out and do what’s best. Isn’t that fantastic?”

SHOW:
>CLIP FROM ERASERHEAD (ITEM 19)

SPEAKER:
We see here that Lynch has gone into more detail about ‘Eddie’ in his film ‘Eraserhead’, it seems that Lynch has an obsession with other peoples obsessions, or idiosyncrasies, and this is what is reflected mostly within his auteurism making it a signature of Lynch’s work. This obsession is also represented within ‘Wild at heart’ (Item 1) where Sailor talks about the man who put cockroaches in his underwear, the world being shown as ‘wild at heart and weird on top’ (item 4) these strange obsessions are those that Lynch litters within his films, obsessions which have no meaning and are there to make the audience question them.

SHOW:
>QUOTE FROM http://www.lynchnet.com/articles.html. (ITEM 7)
‘This is a man who has kept his house in the Hollywood Hills largely unfurnished for years so that he “wouldn’t have to think about it.” He also didn’t want people to visit him there. “I was doing things I didn’t want them to see,” he says. Pressed about what those might be, he will say only: “Things.”’

SPEAKER:
Lynch’s behaviour is shown to have always been odd, and he relates the obsession within his films to the obsessions he has with himself.  However, although he uses contrasting women as a signature within his work he also uses ‘many small USA towns, French names, language and culture, red curtains, strobe lighting, references to dreams.’ (Item 9) His films have also been compared to the theories of Lacanism, which is the difference between the real, the symbolic and the imaginary (item 13).

Therefore, Lynch’s use of contrasting women contributes towards his definition as an auteur, however it is not the only factor that defines him. The fact he was an artist before he started working within the film industry contributes to his auteuristic qualities within making films, and also his idiosyncrasies within his personality add together to make his individuality within his auteurism also.

* These are to be used as guidelines for the structure and content of a good Presentation Script – referencing & arguments are very strong  

Posted by John at 03:24 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: Auteur, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Thursday, 26 September 2013

New Research Investigation Sources Added to ‘Scoop-It’ Page

There are plenty of new links/sources that have been added to the Research Page of this blog that are relevant to many areas of your ‘Small-scale Research Projects’. Click the image above or go to the Research page under the banner.

This page is constantly being updated when I find relevant material for your projects so check it on a regular basis.

Posted by John at 11:41 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Thursday, 12 September 2013

Sample Catalogue Items: Various

Listed below are selected items from a variety of ‘Annotated Catalogue’s’

These will give you a solid guide for how to annotate different research material. These are not linked to one topic/subject, but will be useful to see how to summarise the content and usefulness of each resource item that you will be using to produce your Presentation Script. 

Film
Item 3: The Devil’s Backbone (Guillermo Del Toro, 2001). I chose this film as this film is also based on personal childhood experiences that have influenced certain aspects of the film. Additionally, in this film, like many of his other films the ‘villain’ is misunderstood to what he is trying to achieve. Also, the director linked both ‘The Devil’s Backbone’ and ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ for people he feels would enjoy the film more. Also, it shows elements religion throughout the film and so can be regarded as a key source for discussion around my topic, although not as relevant as my focus film.

Magazines
Item 6: Encore Magazine: A very useful article, written in August 2010. The article is based on the ‘believability scale’ of Tim Burton’s films. This article talks briefly about the films they have worked together on, but lacks detail as they are simply just listed. The pair are referred to as a ‘match made in heaven’, which is a bit of a cliché as all their work together is deep and dark. They are also said to be quirky and weird as they bring out the best in each other, which therefore helps them to produce the films to the best of their abilities as they add their own stamp to it and work together as a team.

Item 6: Time Magazine Interview with Michael Caine, (http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/dvd/the-prestige). In this magazine article Nolan is respected by the writer of this review showing his wide audience how well known his work is. It elaborates how his themes are almost predictable, as you know the ending at the beginning in most of them. This point being in a well-known magazine almost adds to the fact that his work is so well known and how much each piece assembles one another answering the question is he an auteur?


TV
Item 6: This is England on Newsnight Review: This review discusses how Meadows has contradicted the stereotypical view of skinheads as being grounded in racist views, showing the compassionate and heartfelt side of the culture. It also explores how he is able to depict youth culture without using the stereotypical view of violent gangs. The fact that they are far more realistic depictions of youth culture means that they are far more grounded in truth and so are far more relevant. I will use this to discuss how Meadows’ contradicts stereotypes in order to more successfully get his audience to question their beliefs.


Internet
Item 7: http://www.stevenspielberg.co.uk/  This is another useful source as it is Spielbergs own personal site. This, like Wikipedia, gives you a short biography on his life, and also information on his films but is far superior. The site contains some good discussion and insight into my 3 chosen films. This allows me to answer the central argument of my topic question as it backs up the reasons why he uses father figures in the vast majority of his films.

Posted by John at 15:45 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: ‘A’ Grade Coursework, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Wednesday, 11 September 2013

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

Pinewood Dialogues

Discussions with creative figures in film, television, and digital media can be found @ movingimagesource.com

There are interviews with Tim Burton, David Lynch and Martin Scorsese.

Posted by John at 17:33 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Critical Approaches, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

Small-scale research components:

(i) an annotated catalogue of key items of the candidate’s research –

approximately 1000 words in total (15 marks)

The catalogue will contain approximately 15 items selected from the candidate’s total primary and secondary research. Each catalogue item should be appropriately referenced and be accompanied by a brief note (approximately 70 words), which explains how the particular item is relevant to the area of investigation and what it contributes to the overall research.

The catalogue must conclude with a short paragraph which lists significant items (approx 5) not selected for inclusion in the catalogue, offering brief reasons why (up to 200 words).

(ii) a presentation script – approximately 1500 words (25 marks)

The presentation script must take the form of notes for a presentation and could combine (for example) subheadings, bullet points, short pieces of connected prose and reference to visual extracts to illustrate the presentation. Candidates are encouraged to devise a presentation format appropriate to their needs and may, for example, employ digital forms such as powerpoint.

Reference to key items of research from the catalogue must be made explicitly in the presentation. Short credited quotations may be used but care must be taken that the words of the presentation are the candidate’s own. Credited quotations are excluded from the word count.

Posted by John at 13:40 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

Here is another good research site. The link will open on an analysis of the Chinese director Zhang Yimou who is another good example of an auteur.

You will find the site useful for many A2 Modules as it has links to several other A-Level Film resources. The posts are written specifically for film students so the language is relevant and precise.

Posted by John at 13:26 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Auteur, FM3, FM4, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

For a brief overview of what an auteur is, check out this description here on the BBC site which uses Tim Burton as an example. It is useful to see how to apply the theory across a Directors work, whilst establishing similarities in visual style and thematic links between their films.

Posted by John at 12:59 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Auteur, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

Here is an excellent resource for understanding the surrealist films of David Lynch plus links and discussion on auteur theory.

Extract

Andrew Sarris, in “Notes on the Auteur Theory in 1962”, demanded a more detailed definition of the term, transforming “la politique des auteurs” into an auteur “theory”. He proposes three premises to spot an auteur, the first is “the technical competence of a director as a criterion of value”, he says “a great director has to be at least a good director”. The second premise is “the distinguishable personality of the director as a criterion of value. Over a group of films, a director must exhibit certain recurring characteristics of style, which serve as his signature”. The third premise is a more mystic interior meaning:

“Interior meaning is extrapolated from the tension between a director’s personality and his material. This conception of interior meaning comes close to what Astruc defines as mise-en-scene, but not quite. It is not quite the vision of the world a director projects nor quite his attitude to life. It is ambiguous, in any literary sense, because part of it is imbedded in the stuff of cinema and cannot be rendered in non-cinematic terms.”

Posted by John at 12:26 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, Auteur, Experimental and Expanded Film/Video, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

FM3 – Small-scale Research Project

For some very good Director interviews visit About.com here. There are several Directors that are currently being researched posted on this site, with further links, including: Christopher Nolan, Baz Luhrmann, Vincenzo Natali, Martin Scorsese, Tim Burton, Wes Craven, Catherine Hardwicke and many more.

Posted by John at 11:55 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Tuesday, 10 September 2013

Small Scale Research Project: Guidance

Small Scale Research Booklet

View more documents from Belinda Raji

Posted by John at 01:50 0 comments

Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest

Labels: A2 Film, FM3, Small-scale Research Project

Thursday, 29 August 2013

A2 Film Studies Student Enrolment Task – To Be Completed Before First Lesson


Sample: Small Scale Research Project

Here is an opening section from a well structured Annotated Catalogue with good notes and good detail. Use it as a guide to the way your own catalogue should be submitted and structured.
Subject/Topic of Study = Chris Nolan
Focus of study = Flawed Characters/Auteur
Resources = 3 x Chosen Films

Annotated Catalogue: Guidance

Title/Question: 

Male flawed characters with a goal are a predominant theme in Christopher Nolan’s films, does this make him an auteur?

Films
Item 1
Inception- (2010) dr C. Nolan
I chose this as my focus film as it shows Christopher Nolans’ clear auteur presence as he deals with the theme that I am focusing on – a flawed male character, in this film the characters flaw is his emotional life and family that drive the narrative of the film. It also looks at his other auteur themes such as moral ambiguity, the characters and composers he uses and psychology. This film also explores the relationship between Chris Nolan and the genre of Crime films that has established his idiosyncratic style.

Item 2
Batman Begins (2005)- I chose this as my second film to look at as the theme I am looking at is explored in this film. The male character is also flawed with his emotional life as well as his fears. Other themes are also shown in this film such as revenge, power, psychology and moral ambiguity. This film is also in the crime genre and so many of the same conventions are used as in Inception.

Item 3
Insomnia (2002)- This film explores the flaw of a male character, in this film the character suffers from insomnia. Guilt is another theme in this film and is important in defining the role of morality and we see the protagonists desire for justice which is another theme found in the other two films I am looking at. Al Pacino plays a sympathetic protagonist with a degree of warmth. The genre of the film is also crime.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s