Living with Crime FS2 questions

British Film: Social-Political Study – ‘Living with Crime’

This study allows for an exploration of films in which characters are caught up in crime or are living within a culture of crime. While allowing for a study of UK crime films from a genre perspective, the principal focus should be on social and political issues raised by the films. In some cases the narrative may concern characters being drawn in to crime or trapped in a crime culture or trying to resist crime. Films may include Sweet Sixteen, Bullet Boy and London to Brighton. Alternatively, older films such as Performance and Get Carter may be studied.Questions that may be raised include ones relating to gender, race and class. The candidate must show a detailed knowledge of a minimum of  two films.  You should discuss a minimum of two British films in your answer.

Either

11. What are some of the ways in which ‘living with crime’ is explored through the narratives of the films you have studied for this topic? [40]

Level 4

• The idea of ‘living with crime’ will be very well understood and its relationship to chosen films delineated clearly and confidently.
• A very good understanding and appreciation of narrative in the chosen films.
• A very good ability to relate narrative to the theme of ‘living with crime’ in developing a direct and insightful response to the question.
• The best candidates will emphasise the constructed nature of the films studied rather than taking them as unproblematic social representations of life – with a particular emphasis on how narrative has been shaped as a vehicle for the representation of ‘living with crime’

12. How far are the circumstances and choices available to key characters in the films you have studied for this topic related to their social class?

Level 4
• The idea of ‘circumstances and choices available to key characters’ will be very well understood and its relationship to chosen films delineated clearly and confidently.
• A very good understanding and appreciation of social class as represented in the chosen films.
• A very good ability to relate character to social class in developing an open, enquiring response to the question.
• The best candidates will emphasise the constructed nature of the films studied rather than taking them as unproblematic social representations of life – with a particular emphasis on how ‘circumstances and choices’ may be regarded as the construct of macro features, while social class may be seen as more the construct of micro features.

11. How far do the films you have studied for this topic depend on genre conventions to tell their stories? [40]

Level 4

• A very good understanding and appreciation of genre conventions and how far their chosen films use them.
• A very good understanding of how far genre conventions contribute to telling their stories (of living with crime).
• The idea of ‘living with crime’ will be very well understood and its relationship to the chosen films expressed clearly and confidently.
• The best candidates may consider how far films depend on genre conventions (rather than simply use them) to tell their stories of living with crime and may illustrate this through specific examples.

12. How are different groups of people represented in the films you have studied for this topic?

Level 4

• A very good understanding and appreciation of how groups of people are represented in the chosen films.    Groups of people may be interpreted in terms of groups of people appearing in the film (‘criminal groups’, for example) or in terms of social groups such as those based on gender, ethnicity or social class.
• The question implies comparing and contrasting the representation of at least two groups to demonstrate different kinds of representation.   Candidates at this level will be able to demonstrate some sense of comparison/contrast.
• A very good ability to explore representation, demonstrating how representations are underlined/presented in terms of micro and macro features.
• The best candidates may emphasise the constructed nature of the films studied and recognise the significance of film representation.

11. How important is narrative structure in communicating the theme of ‘living with crime’ in the  films you have studied for this topic? [40]

12. How far are criminal characters represented as victims of their circumstances in the films you have  studied for this topic?

Questions 11 & 12:

• An appreciation of the messages and values contained within the chosen films.
• An understanding of the relationship between form and content, possibly with a particular reference to narrative and generic features.
• An understanding of contexts, especially time and place.

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